Exploitation of Exportation

In Zlolniski’s piece, Water Flowing North of the Border, we are shown the way in which the people of Mexico are sacrificed for the profits to be made in the US. Water is being exported in crops (and on its own, apparently) at a rate much greater than is being replenished by rainfall. When it comes down to where the money is directed, the citizens vs the American buyers, the priority is not domestic.

While this is tragic, it is not an uncommon occurrence. Struggling states are constantly putting the foreign buyer over the needs of their citizens. When jobs are outsourced to the developing world there is a tension between the investor’s desire for maximizing profit and the country’s need to maintain minimal standards for the employees. In the case of the haves versus the have nots, the employees rarely come out on top. The state must weigh the need for basic working conditions with the fear of losing the FDI to another country willing to let their people suffer in return for invested capital. In areas with great need, foreign companies wield their power in a race to the bottom.

In the case of infrastructure and human needs, like water, the sacrifice of the local people has detrimental effects. For instance, if clean water cannot reach a segment of the population, whether through faulty infrastructure or lack of resources, major health risks may occur. People MUST drink water, and because of this, they will be forced to drink the closest thing to it in a crisis. If the closest water supply for many miles is a stagnant source, it will have to do. This is how many people in the developing world succumb to diarrheal diseases. Access to clean water is one of the most vital resources to life and much of the world is without it.

When states begin sending water to other countries in the form of exports over providing what is needed to their own people, a great exploitation of the developing world has occurred.

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3 thoughts on “Exploitation of Exportation

  1. This article really opened my eyes to the heart-wrenching conditions too many people in this world face in order for the well-off to profit even more than they already are. The Western world already hurts developing countries through their economic and environmental policies, sending money and weapons to those who either don’t need them or who use them for harm. The West already profits at the expense of the poor, but supposedly that is not enough. The West feels the need to take the necessary survival resources from the residents of developing countries, as those countries’ governments might as well literally throw their local populations under a bus–depriving local residents from water and basic human needs in order to profit the rich, these governments are, without a second thought, pushing the local populations of developing countries closer to their graves as they must suffer from chronic diseases, dehydration, malnutrition, and other conditions that no human being deserves.

  2. This article really opened my eyes to the heart-wrenching conditions too many people in this world face in order for the well-off to profit even more than they already are. The Western world already hurts developing countries through their economic and environmental policies, sending money and weapons to those who either don’t need them or who use them for harm. The West already profits at the expense of the poor, but supposedly that is not enough. The West feels the need to take the necessary survival resources from the residents of developing countries, as those countries’ governments might as well literally throw their local populations under a bus–depriving local residents from water and basic human needs in order to profit the rich, these governments are, without a second thought, pushing the local populations of developing countries closer to their graves as they must suffer from chronic diseases, dehydration, malnutrition, among other conditions that no human being deserves.

  3. Water is one of the basic resources we all take for granted, but, unfortunately, due to overexploitation and climate changes, many people in the world do not have access to clean drinking water. This week’s class, articles, and video, completely changed the way I view the availabiltiy of water. For people living in rural areas of developing world, their sustenance depends on agricultural activities which require water. Without water, they not only not have drinking water, they are also more prone to drinking any water available, often resorting to contaminated water. Unavailabiltiy of clean water is one of the leading causes of many preventable diseases. In order to fight the issue of global health, it is important that everyone has access to basic life resources such as food, water, and shelter.

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